Vivaldi: Virtuoso Cantatas – Philippe Jaroussky

14,50

1 CD 

Classical Music 

Erato

1 December 2022

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Description

724354572128

Antonio Vivaldi

Cantata RV670 ‘Alla caccia dell’alme e de’ cori’

Cantata RV671 ‘Care selve, amici prati’

Cantata RV676 ‘Pianti, sospiri e dimandar mercede’

Cantata RV677 ‘Qual per ignoto calle’

Orlando Furioso, RV 728: “Piangerò sinche l’onda” (Ruggiero)

Perfidissimo cor! Inquo fato!, RV 674

Prelude, RV 728

Sonata No. 1 in B flat major for cello and basso continuo

Tito Manlio, RV 778: “Di verde ulivo” (Vitellia)

Artists

Philippe Jaroussky (Counter-Tenor)

Ensemble Artaserse

It is now lost, the great art of the male sopranos and altos of the castrato era. It is all the more gratifying when a countertenor today succeeds in following in the footsteps of these legendary singers in such a way that even experts can imagine: This is how it must have been! The French professional magazine Diapason attested the French countertenor Philippe Jaroussky to have carried a very clear echo of the castrato art into our time. Now this praise can be verified by means of a highly virtuosic group of works by Antonio Vivaldi: his secular cantatas. These are, so to speak, short and small cast operas, which Vivaldi composed here entirely according to the fashion of the time. Their purpose was to take the singers’ art away from the stage and into the palaces of music-hungry high society. Philippe Jaroussky, who has already recorded French baroque music from the time of the “Sun King” for Virgin and participated in the recording of Scarlatti’s oratorio Sedecia, now takes on a new challenge together with the Ensemble Artaserse. Born in France in 1978, the multi-award-winning artist studied at the Paris Conservatory and made his debut at the Royaumont Festival in 1999.

The countertenor Philippe Jaroussky soars as effortlessly as a bird, with no sense of strain: perhaps – for we can never know for certain – this is how the great castrati of the 18th century sounded. He was certainly convincing in the soprano role of Nero in the Euroarts DVD of Handel’s Agrippina. Little is known about the background to these cantatas. Each is in the familiar form of two dacapo arias, separated and sometimes preceded by a recitative. The themes are equally familiar, generally concerned with the inconstancy or inaccessibility of the beloved, with reference to the storms, bright dawns and shipwrecks of opera seria. Alla caccia dell’alme describes ‘barbarous Cloris’ hunting souls and hearts, with predictable consequences for the victim. And there is a delightful surprise: no horn depicting the chase, of course: instead, here and elsewhere, we have the jolly bassoon of Jérémie Papasergio on the bass line. In fact the composition of the continuo group varies within each cantata and even during a movement: the ‘A’ section of the first aria in Pianti, sospiri e dimandar mercede features bassoon and lute, the ‘B’ section cello and harpsichord. This is justified by the quality of the playing but to switch from harpsichord to organ in the same piece seems to me fussy. Philippe Jaroussky is sweet-toned and, as well as singing the divisions with wonderful control, he shows care for the meaning of the words. The aria from Tito Manlio, which really was written for contralto, finds him duetting with the cello obbligato of Emilia Gliozzi – superb!

The countertenor Philippe Jaroussky soars as effortlessly as a bird, with no sense of strain: perhaps – for we can never know for certain – this is how the great castrati of the 18th century sounded. He was certainly convincing in the soprano role of Nero in the Euroarts DVD of Handel's Agrippina.
Little is known about the background to these cantatas. Each is in the familiar form of two dacapo arias, separated and sometimes preceded by a recitative. The themes are equally familiar, generally concerned with the inconstancy or inaccessibility of the beloved, with reference to the storms, bright dawns and shipwrecks of opera seria. Alla caccia dell'alme describes 'barbarous Cloris' hunting souls and hearts, with predictable consequences for the victim. And there is a delightful surprise: no horn depicting the chase, of course: instead, here and elsewhere, we have the jolly bassoon of Jérémie Papasergio on the bass line.
In fact the composition of the continuo group varies within each cantata and even during a movement: the 'A' section of the first aria in Pianti, sospiri e dimandar mercede features bassoon and lute, the 'B' section cello and harpsichord.
This is justified by the quality of the playing but to switch from harpsichord to organ in the same piece seems to me fussy.
Philippe Jaroussky is sweet-toned and, as well as singing the divisions with wonderful control, he shows care for the meaning of the words. The aria from Tito Manlio, which really was written for contralto, finds him duetting with the cello obbligato of Emilia Gliozzi – superb! 



The countertenor Philippe Jaroussky soars as effortlessly as a bird, with no sense of strain: perhaps – for we can never know for certain – this is how the great castrati of the 18th century sounded. He was certainly convincing in the soprano role of Nero in the Euroarts DVD of Handel's Agrippina.
Little is known about the background to these cantatas. Each is in the familiar form of two dacapo arias, separated and sometimes preceded by a recitative. The themes are equally familiar, generally concerned with the inconstancy or inaccessibility of the beloved, with reference to the storms, bright dawns and shipwrecks of opera seria. Alla caccia dell'alme describes 'barbarous Cloris' hunting souls and hearts, with predictable consequences for the victim. And there is a delightful surprise: no horn depicting the chase, of course: instead, here and elsewhere, we have the jolly bassoon of Jérémie Papasergio on the bass line.
In fact the composition of the continuo group varies within each cantata and even during a movement: the 'A' section of the first aria in Pianti, sospiri e dimandar mercede features bassoon and lute, the 'B' section cello and harpsichord.
This is justified by the quality of the playing but to switch from harpsichord to organ in the same piece seems to me fussy.
Philippe Jaroussky is sweet-toned and, as well as singing the divisions with wonderful control, he shows care for the meaning of the words. The aria from Tito Manlio, which really was written for contralto, finds him duetting with the cello obbligato of Emilia Gliozzi – superb! Gramophone Classical Music Guide 2010