Franz Schubert: Music for Violin & Piano

2 CD 

Classical Music 

Decca

Unavailable.

12 August 2022Ερώτηση για το προϊόν / Product Inquiry

Description

028946674826

Franz Peter Schubert

Fantasie in C major for violin and piano, D934

Grand Duo for Violin and Piano in A Major, D574

Sonata (Sonatina) for violin & piano in A minor, D385 (Op. posth. 137 No. 2)

Sonata (Sonatina) for violin & piano in D major, D384 (Op. posth. 137 No. 1)

Sonata in A minor ‘Arpeggione’, D821

Sonatina in G minor, D408 (Op. posth. 137 No. 3)

Details

Franz Peter Schubert

Fantasie in C major for violin and piano, D934

Sonatina in G minor, D408 (Op. posth. 137 No. 3)

Grand Duo for Violin and Piano in A Major, D574

Sonata (Sonatina) for violin & piano in D major, D384 (Op. posth. 137 No. 1)

Sonata (Sonatina) for violin & piano in A minor, D385 (Op. posth. 137 No. 2)

Radu Lupu (Piano), Szymon Goldberg (Conductor)

Franz Peter Schubert

Sonata in A minor ‘Arpeggione’, D821

Jean Françaix (Piano), Maurice Gendron (Cello)

Mining the archives can produce curious results: since Schubert’s violin and piano output was small, and since the demands of a Double Decca are large, we get a cello and piano add-on at the end, in the form of Schubert’s “Arpeggione” sonata played by cellist Maurice Gendron and pianist Jean Françaix. Recorded in 1954, their sound quality is primitive, but their leisurely approach makes an interesting foil to that of the main event. Don’t be put off by the fact that these chamber sonatas are minor works, with only intermittent hints of the divine poignancy of Schubert at his best. The early ones offer fascinating glimpses of his genius unfolding; the later music, which is rarely performed, is shot through with unexpected textures and harmonic shifts. And it’s all wonderfully played: Goldberg’s Polish background–and tuition from the great Carl Flesch–is reflected in his quintessentially central-European expressiveness and purity of tone; Lupu, whose playing is now rather eccentric, has here found the perfect mode for the occasion. As Schubert intended, the instruments have parity–there’s no question of “piano accompaniment”. The (unsigned) programme note is excellent on the music, but why nothing on the performers? They aren’t all dead, and they’re also rather interesting. Would you have guessed that Françaix’s other activities included writing the music for the films of Sacha Guitry? –Michael Church